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Reviews Page

Many e-zines include a page or more of reviews of such things as movies, books, television shows, CDs, and so on. Here's a format I might use for my reviews.

Jazz & Music Books

African Aerican Entertainment
Rosa Pryor

Rosa “Rambling Rose” Pryor, a native Baltimorean, has been an R&B music enthusiast since 1957. She started as a singer, songwriter and musician, playing saxophone and piano for the group she founded, “Little Johnny and the Twilight’s”. Rosa and the Twilight’s had an opportunity to meet and open for great performers such as The Shirrelles, The Chantels, Ruby & the Romantics, Jimi Hendrix and Sam Cooke. Her commitment to every aspect of the music industry is a testimony of her deep soul felt love for the artistry in its entirety.

As an entrepreneur since 1966, Rosa helped other musicians establish their careers. She gathered local neighborhood children from their nests, pruned and greased their musical wings, and sent them soaring into flight. Her passions nourished more than 20 music groups. She coordinated, trained, counseled, and managed them individually and as a group.

Starting in 1969, she assisted, managed and produced many professional, local R&B, Pop and Jazz musicians and singers. Because of her unyielding passion and diligent efforts, Rosa soon became known as one of the top promoters and managers in Maryland. She became a professional, licensed booking agent and established her own promotional/marketing agency called, Rosa Pryor Productions, which booked many of the jazz musicians in the Baltimore/Washington area. She has also lent her talents to Washington, D.C., New York, New Jersey, Delaware, California, Pennsylvania, North & South Carolina, Detroit and Chicago, etc. She proved an invaluable asset to local nightclub and bar owners as a business developer, consultant and manager.

In 1971, the late, Ida Peters, the Afro-American Newspaper Entertainment Editor quoted Rosa as being, “…the most talked about, popular and the only Black female promoter in Maryland/Washington Metropolitan area ….”

Rosa’s trade name is “Rambling Rose”, a name that was given to her by the late great Nat “King” Cole when she was touring in the 50’s. Red has always been her favorite color and when she used to perform, she always gave out her favorite flower, a long stem red rose, which became her signature.

Rosa “Rambling Rose” Pryor was the Entertainment Editor, Account Executive and Entertainment Columnist for the Baltimore Times and the Annapolis Times for ten years before she resigned in November 1998. From 1997 to 1998, she wrote an entertainment column for the "Buzz N’Around Baltimore Magazine". Rosa is the co-author of a collector’s item book called, “African America Entertainment In Baltimore”, which was published in June 2003 and sold out first print in six weeks and now the book is in its third print. She began her research to write this book on the legendary Pennsylvania Avenue clubs and entertainment of its heydays in 1989.

“Rambling Rose”, as her readers affectionately call her is currently an entertainment columnist and reporter with the Afro-American Newspaper, and has been since 1999; The Informer Newspaper, The Northwest Voice and she freelance for other periodicals and have over 180,000 readerships. Rosa is a long time member of the National Association of Black Journalist, (NABJ).

Rosa is the founder, CEO, and Chairman of the Board of the Rosa Pryor Music Scholarship Fund, Inc. created in 1991. The fund provides money for aspiring musicians, ages 5-17, to pay tuition and purchase instruments. She is also founder & CEO of an entertainment company with her husband, William “Shorty” Trusty, called RoseGarden Entertainment Enterprises, Inc. This is a company that provides entertainment, local and national for clubs, casinos, hotels, social events and racetracks.
Rosa “Rambling Rose” Pryor, a native Baltimorean, has been an R&B music enthusiast since 1957. She started as a singer, songwriter and musician, playing saxophone and piano for the group she founded, “Little Johnny and the Twilight’s”. Rosa and the Twilight’s had an opportunity to meet and open for great performers such as The Shirrelles, The Chantels, Ruby & the Romantics, Jimi Hendrix and Sam Cooke. Her commitment to every aspect of the music industry is a testimony of her deep soul felt love for the artistry in its entirety.

As an entrepreneur since 1966, Rosa helped other musicians establish their careers. She gathered local neighborhood children from their nests, pruned and greased their musical wings, and sent them soaring into flight. Her passions nourished more than 20 music groups. She coordinated, trained, counseled, and managed them individually and as a group.

Starting in 1969, she assisted, managed and produced many professional, local R&B, Pop and Jazz musicians and singers. Because of her unyielding passion and diligent efforts, Rosa soon became known as one of the top promoters and managers in Maryland. She became a professional, licensed booking agent and established her own promotional/marketing agency called, Rosa Pryor Productions, which booked many of the jazz musicians in the Baltimore/Washington area. She has also lent her talents to Washington, D.C., New York, New Jersey, Delaware, California, Pennsylvania, North & South Carolina, Detroit and Chicago, etc. She proved an invaluable asset to local nightclub and bar owners as a business developer, consultant and manager.

In 1971, the late, Ida Peters, the Afro-American Newspaper Entertainment Editor quoted Rosa as being, “…the most talked about, popular and the only Black female promoter in Maryland/Washington Metropolitan area ….”

Rosa’s trade name is “Rambling Rose”, a name that was given to her by the late great Nat “King” Cole when she was touring in the 50’s. Red has always been her favorite color and when she used to perform, she always gave out her favorite flower, a long stem red rose, which became her signature.

Rosa “Rambling Rose” Pryor was the Entertainment Editor, Account Executive and Entertainment Columnist for the Baltimore Times and the Annapolis Times for ten years before she resigned in November 1998. From 1997 to 1998, she wrote an entertainment column for the "Buzz N’Around Baltimore Magazine". Rosa is the co-author of a collector’s item book called, “African America Entertainment In Baltimore”, which was published in June 2003 and sold out first print in six weeks and now the book is in its third print. She began her research to write this book on the legendary Pennsylvania Avenue clubs and entertainment of its heydays in 1989.

“Rambling Rose”, as her readers affectionately call her is currently an entertainment columnist and reporter with the Afro-American Newspaper, and has been since 1999; The Informer Newspaper, The Northwest Voice and she freelance for other periodicals and have over 180,000 readerships. Rosa is a long time member of the National Association of Black Journalist, (NABJ).

Rosa is the founder, CEO, and Chairman of the Board of the Rosa Pryor Music Scholarship Fund, Inc. created in 1991. The fund provides money for aspiring musicians, ages 5-17, to pay tuition and purchase instruments. She is also founder & CEO of an entertainment company with her husband, William “Shorty” Trusty, called RoseGarden Entertainment Enterprises, Inc. This is a company that provides entertainment, local and national for clubs, casinos, hotels, social events and racetracks.

Jazz Movies

"Eubie Blake Plays" (USA 1922)
 - b&w, ca. 4 min.)

Although sound movies were introduced not before 1928/29 this experimental film with sound is the first Jazz film (produced by Lee De Forest Phonofilms). Eubie Blake and Noble Sissle are playing "Swanee River" on two pianos. Musically not too interesting (some wouldn't even say that the music is Jazz), but the first sound movie with let's say: a nearness to Jazz!

Jazz Music

Home
Josh Rouse

A quirky sophomore effort by a singer-songwriter to watch. Starts strong ("Marvin Gaye" and "Direction" are standouts) but eventually all the songs begin to sound alike, which is unfortunate. Josh should maybe hire a producer more willing to experiment with his sound.
- Submitted by Patricia