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Black History Month/Special Edition

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Great Blacks In Wax

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Then And Now

The National Great Blacks In Wax Museum is among the nations most dynamic cultural and educational institutions. Because it is a wax museum committed solely to the study and preservation of African American history, it is also among the most unique. Primarily, the presentation of life-size, life-like wax figures highlighting historical and contemporary personalities of African ancestry defines its uniqueness.

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Can you hear it? The crunch of gravel under your tires, the hum of the car engine, the laughter of friends and chatter of loved ones. They're the sounds of a road trip; of good times and new adventures. Under clear summer skies or a soft autumn breeze, Baltimore is a city of wondrous discovery. During fragrant spring Sundays or crisp winter nights, Baltimore has so much to share.

The history of African Americans in Baltimore is one of power, courage and tenacity. Our city has been home to many "freedom fighters" — individuals who chose liberty, transformation and human rights over comfort and personal security.

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Frederick Douglass moved to Baltimore City from Maryland's Eastern Shore as an 8-year-old boy. Born into slavery, Douglass taught himself how to read and write, though doing so was against state law. Even as Douglass struggled against the physical indignities of slavery, he maintained an unshakable belief that no man had the right to "own" him, in mind, body or spirit. His convictions propelled him to become a famous abolitionist, publisher, writer, orator and great American thinker. A statue of Frederick Douglass stands at Morgan State University, and during the summer months you can take the Frederick Douglass "Path to Freedom" Walking Tour.

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Frederick Douglass moved to Baltimore City from Maryland's Eastern Shore as an 8-year-old boy. Born into slavery, Douglass taught himself how to read and write, though doing so was against state law. Even as Douglass struggled against the physical indignities of slavery, he maintained an unshakable belief that no man had the right to "own" him, in mind, body or spirit. His convictions propelled him to become a famous abolitionist, publisher, writer, orator and great American thinker. A statue of Frederick Douglass stands at Morgan State University, and during the summer months you can take the Frederick Douglass "Path to Freedom" Walking Tour.

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Fifty years after Douglass' death in 1895, another Baltimore hero was following in his footsteps and continuing the fight for equality and civil rights. Thurgood Marshall, born and raised in West Baltimore, became America's first African American Supreme Court Justice in 1967. But more than a decade before his appointment to the Supreme Court, Marshall had already made national news. As Director-Counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Marshall led the legal team that won Brown v. The Board of Education, the landmark 1954 Supreme Court case which marked the end of legal segregation in America's schools. Today, visitors can schedule a tour of the NAACP's national headquarters in Baltimore, and view a life-size replica of Marshall at The National Great Blacks In Wax Museum.

This Baltimore Jazzine Special Edition is a COMMUNITY SERVICE from New Jazz Audience mulitmedia entertainment group and has accepted no money or sponsorship or inkind services or otherwise from any source to publish this site.
 
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